pew research

A few notes about online journalism

by Emily Overholt & Olivia Nelson & Katharine Huntley-Bachers

As budding multimedia journalists, it’s important to follow what people are actually reading and what impact your work is making. Here are some interesting finds from across the web.

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Most Americans use many media devices for news

    • Despite the constant complaints that “print is dying,” people still read newspapers in print more than on cell phones or tablets, according to the American Press Institute Monday. Television and Radio still trump print, just like they did years ago, and computers are moving up in the news hierarchy. But still, it’s notable that the iPad hasn’t taken down The New York Times Sunday edition yet. These results were found in a nationally representative telephone survey of 1,492 adults conducted from January 9 through February 16, 2014.
    • Google is slipping as the best way to click through to news and losing ground to Facebook. According to the Authority Report, Google dropped 8 percent to 38 percent of all traffic referrals whereas jumped 10 percent to 26 percent.  Notable is that Twitter is still lagging with less than 5 percent of traffic. So maybe that witty tweet about your story isn’t getting you as many reads as you think.
    • Despite the highly viral nature of entertainment news, sportswriting still reigns supreme as the most viewed stories on news sites. Thanks Red Sox.
    • Still, a link isn’t going to hold a readers attention for long. Pew Journalism found that sites get longer traffic if their readers go to the site, not a shared story.
Readers are more likely to spend more time on a site if they actively seek it out as opposed to clicking through a link from social media, according to Pew Journalism.

Readers are more likely to spend more time on a site if they actively seek it out as opposed to clicking through a link from social media, according to Pew Journalism.

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